Why Canada?

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Canada offers the world’s soundest banking system to support new investment and has a growing list of trade agreements that represent the most ambitious trade expansion plan in Canadian history.

The country’s strong focus on innovation and creativity encourages entrepreneurs and makes new entrants welcome. Canada's educated talent base and strategically leveraged natural resources sector add irresistible appeal for expanding international companies.

Canada’s large cities – Toronto, Montréal, Vancouver, Ottawa, Calgary, Québec City, Winnipeg, Waterloo Region, London, Halifax and Saskatoon ­– accounted for 52% of Canada's population, 54.5% of its GDP and 68% of GDP growth in Canada between 2008 and 2013.

 

Economic fundamentals

 

The compelling list of reasons to consider Canada’s large cities starts with the country’s stellar economic fundamentals:

  • Rated the world’s soundest banking system five years in a row by the World Economic Forum
  • Fastest economic growth among G7 countries expected for 2013 according to the International      Monetary Fund (IMF) and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
  • Lowest net debt-to-GDP ratio in the G7 according to the IMF
  • Lowest overall tax rate on new business investment in the G7
  • Highest proportion of college and university graduates among OECD countries – 51% of the adult population has a post-secondary degree
  • One of the most generous R&D tax incentives in the industrialized world
  • Lowest costs in G7 for R&D intensive sectors, with up to a 10.7% advantage over the U.S.     
  • High quality of life featuring public healthcare
  • A commitment to the rule of law and a strong justice system 

Soundness of Banks World Rank

Standing among 142 countries. Ranking based on the degree of soundness of financial institutions. Source: Global Competitiveness Report 2011-2012

Standing among 142 countries. Ranking based on the degree of soundness of financial institutions. Source: Global Competitiveness Report 2011-2012