Why Canada? 

CANADA'S COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES          

(Source: Invest in Canada, May 2016)

Canada is open for business and welcomes foreign investment:

  • Canada is the best country in the G-20 for business according to both Forbes and Bloomberg.
  • Canada ranks 1st in the G-20 for doing business over the five-year period 2016-2020, says the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU).
  • Canada is the easiest place to start a business in the G‑20, according to the World Bank.
  • Canada was the largest recipient of FDI inflows per capita in the G-7 over the 2010-2014 period.
  • Canada’s growth in business investment has been by far the strongest in the G-7 during the recession of 2008 - 2009.
 
Source: "Think Canada" by Invest in Canada april 2016

Source: "Think Canada" by Invest in Canada april 2016

 

Canada provides a top performing economy for businesses to innovate, grow and succeed:

  • Canada led all G-7 countries in economic growth over the past decade (2005-2014).
  • Canada has posted the second fastest employment growth in the G-7 from 2005-2014.
  • Canada’s economy has recouped more than all of the output and jobs lost during the recession.
  • Since June 2009, over 1.3 million jobs have been created in Canada, an increase of 8.0% with over 80% of new jobs being in the private sector and full time.
 
Long-term GDP growth statistics from the World Bank place Canada at the top of the G-7 in the last ten years.  Source: World Bank: World Development Indicators database, April 2015.

Long-term GDP growth statistics from the World Bank place Canada at the top of the G-7 in the last ten years.  Source: World Bank: World Development Indicators database, April 2015.

 
 

Canada’s Fiscal strength provides operational certainty for business:

  • Canada currently has the lowest net debt-to-GDP ratio in the G-7, according to the International Monetary Fund (IMF).
  • Canada has balanced its budget in 2015-16, with a federal debt-to-GDP ratio that is projected to decline to 27.9% in 2017-18 and to meet its target of 25% of GDP by 2021.
  • Canada’s sound fiscal strength is reflected by its triple A credit rating from Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s and Fitch.

Canada’s strength is reinforced by the world’s most stable financial sector:

  • For the seventh consecutive year, the World Economic Forum (WEF) has declared Canada's banking system to be the soundest in the world.
  • During the financial crisis, no Canadian bank or insurer failed and none required bailouts.
  • Five major Canadian banks are ranked among the 10 safest banks in North America by Global Finance Magazine.
 
Standing among 148 countries. Ranking based on the degree of soundness of financial institutions. Source: Global Competitiveness Report, 2014-2015  ** Standing among 500 world banks based on total assets and long-term credit ratings. Source: Global Finance Magazine, September 2014

Standing among 148 countries. Ranking based on the degree of soundness of financial institutions. Source: Global Competitiveness Report, 2014-2015 
** Standing among 500 world banks based on total assets and long-term credit ratings. Source: Global Finance Magazine, September 2014

 
 

Canada offers a low cost, low tax environment:

  • Overall business costs in Canada are the lowest in the G‑7 and 7.2% lower than the U.S., according to KPMG’s 2014 Competitive Alternatives Report.
  • KPMG’s Focus on Tax 2014 also places Canada as the most tax competitive country in the G-7.
  • Canada has been first among G-20 countries to make itself a tariff-free zone for manufacturers, by having decreased since 2010, tariffs on machinery, equipment and industrial inputs to zero in 2015.
  • The federal statutory corporate income tax rate in Canada – at 15% in 2014 - is 20 percentage points lower than that of the United States.
  • Canada's combined federal-provincial general corporate income tax rate of 26.3% in 2014 is below the level of most other G‑7 countries and about 13 percentage points lower than the U.S.
Source: KPMG Competitive Alternatives 2014

Source: KPMG Competitive Alternatives 2014

Source: KPMG Competitive Alternatives 2014: Focus on Tax

Source: KPMG Competitive Alternatives 2014: Focus on Tax

Canada offers a world leading cost effective R&D environment:

  • Canada’s leads the G-7 in R&D spending in higher education as a share of GDP.
  • Canada combines one of the best R&D tax incentives in the G-7 with increased certainty of eligibility and reduced administrative costs for businesses.
  • R&D-intensive sectors in Canada also enjoy the lowest costs in the G-7, these being 15.8% lower than in the U.S. according to KPMG’s 2014 Competitive Alternatives Report.
                                                                                                     Source: KPMG Competitive Alternatives 2014

                                                                                                    

Source: KPMG Competitive Alternatives 2014

Source: OECD Main Science and Technology Indicators, 2014, Volume 2, March 2015.

Source: OECD Main Science and Technology Indicators, 2014, Volume 2, March 2015.

Canada provides business with a highly educated and competitive workforce:

  • Canada offers business the most educated talent pool among countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), with more than half of its population aged 25 to 64 having a tertiary level education.
  • Canada is the second most talent-competitive country in the G-20, according to the Institute for Management Development (IMD).
  • Canadians are linguistically diverse, with 1 in 5 Canadians speaking one of over 200 languages in addition to either of Canada's official languages of English and French.
 
                                           Source: OECD, Education at a Glance, Interim Report, January 2015

                                           Source: OECD, Education at a Glance, Interim Report, January 2015

 

Canada is a great place to live and prosper:

  • In 2013, Canadians enjoyed the second highest standard of living in the G-7, as measured by GDP per capita, according to the World Bank.
  • The OECD’s Better Life Index shows Canada as best in the G-7 in terms of overall living conditions and quality of life, based on a variety of indicators including housing, income, jobs, environment, education and health.
  • Canada ranks 1st in the G-7, according to The Heritage Foundation, in providing the economic freedom for a prosperous society.
 
Source: OECD May 2014 * Index based on weighted average of 11 topics (housing, income,  jobs, community, education, environment, civic engagement, health, life satisfaction, safety and work-life balance)  identified as essential by the OECD in the areas of material living conditions and quality of life.

Source: OECD May 2014 * Index based on weighted average of 11 topics (housing, income,  jobs, community, education, environment, civic engagement, health, life satisfaction, safety and work-life balance)  identified as essential by the OECD in the areas of material living conditions and quality of life.

 

Canada is your gateway to the world:

  • 16 of Canada’s 20 largest cities are located within a 90-minute drive of the Canada‑U.S. border, anchoring trade valued at more than US$2.0 billion crossing the Canada‑U.S. border each day.
     
  • Canada’s status as a NAFTA member offers foreign investors in Canada preferential access to a North American market of nearly $20 trillion (GDP) with over 480 million consumers.
     
  • Once CETA comes into force, foreign investors in Canada will have guaranteed preferential access to both the EU and North American markets; this represents nearly 980 million consumers with a combined GDP of almost US$38 trillion, or nearly one-half of the world’s output of goods and services.
     
  • Canada's major free trade negotiations, with the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and bilaterally with India and Japan, mean further enhanced market access is on the way for firms investing in Canada.
     
  • Through tax and tariff export-related programs, Canada provides benefits to businesses comparable to those found in Foreign Trade Zones (FTZ) in other countries, while having the advantages of not being site-specific.